Creating the MPOC, Part 2: Validation of a measure of processes of care-giving

Creating the MPOC, Part 2: Validation of a measure of processes of care-giving and a cross-sectional study of processes of care-giving and parental psychosocial well-being

This cross-sectional study continued a multi-year program of research conducted to understand the relation between caregiving offered to parents of children with neuro-developmental disabilities and parents' mental health. Specifically, this project was designed to examine the strength of the link between parents' perceptions of family-centred, professionally-provided caregiving and their emotional well-being (feelings of distress and depression). This was done in the context of other factors that might affect well-being (child behavior problems, coping strategies of parents, protective factors in the social environment, child factors related to disability, and family factors).

In this process, further validation of the Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC) was conducted, and MPOC was used in a multi-centre cross-sectional study relating "received" or perceived professional care to parental psychosocial well-being. Refinement of the measure resulted in a 56-item version of MPOC containing five scales: Enabling and Partnership, Providing General Information, Providing Specific Information about the Child, Coordinated and Comprehensive Care, and Respectful and Supportive Care. Studies of reliability and validity for MPOC-56 demonstrated good psychometric properties.

164 parents of children with non-progressive neurodevelopmental disorders (primarily cerebral palsy, spina bifida, or hydrocephalus) completed a series of instruments measuring the constructs of interest. Structural equation modeling showed that more family-centered caregiving was a significant predictor of parents' well-being. The most important predictors of well-being were child behavior problems and protective factors in the social environment. Services are most beneficial when they are delivered in a family-centered manner and address parent-identified issues such as the availability of social support, family functioning, and child behavior problems.

Impact

The creation of this valid and reliable psychometric instrument has allowed for extensive research addressing the relation between professional behaviours and parental well-being.

Project Updates

  • Read about Part 1 of this multi-year study.
  • Read short summary of findings: "Processes of Care Study - 1997"
  • Keeping Current on Parent Satisfaction (99-4).
  • King, G., King, S., Rosenbaum, P. & Goffin, R. (1999). Family-centered caregiving and well-being of parents of children with disabilities: Linking process with outcome. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 24, 41-53.
  • King, G., Law, M., King, S., & Rosenbaum, P. (1998). Parents' and service providers' perceptions of the family-centredness of children's rehabilitation services. Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics,18 (1), 21-40.
  • King, G., Rosenbaum, R., & King, S. (1997). Evaluating family-centred service using a measure of parents' perceptions. Child: Care, Health and Development, 23(1), 47-62.
  • King, S., Rosenbaum, P., & King, G. (1996). Parents' perceptions of caregiving: Development and validation of a measure of processes. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 38, 757-772.
  • King, G., King, S., & Rosenbaum, P. (1996). How mothers and fathers view professional care-giving for children with disabilities. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 38, 397-407.
  • King, S., Rosenbaum, P., & King, G. (1995). The Measure of Processes of Care: A means to assess family-centred behaviours of health care providers. Hamilton, Ontario: Neurodevelopmental Clinical Research Unit, McMaster University.
  • King, G., King, S., & Rosenbaum, P. (1995). Parents' perceptions of care-giving provided by ATCO centres: A report to centres from the MPOC research group. Hamilton, ON: Neurodevelopmental Clinical Research Unit, McMaster University.
  • King, S., King, G., & Rosenbaum, P. (1994). Report to parents from the MPOC research group on the development of a Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC). Hamilton, ON: Neurodevelopmental Clinical Research Unit, McMaster University. 

Research Team

  • S King
  • A Willan 

Funding Agency

Ontario Ministry of Health - $164,438 (1993 - 1995)

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